All posts by Red Hawk

Sharing a Message: “Stop Poaching”

Today we want to share a great message from our friend Mikkel Rasmus Hansen who has created an incredible infographic illustrating many aspects of the African poaching crisis.

Check out his website Safari Tanzania (mostly in Danish), stop by his blog to share this message on social media, and look out for more great visuals from him on the illegal wildlife trade in the future!

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Made by Safari Tanzania

African Wildlife Encounter #2: African Wild Dogs with Puppy

On this day while in Tembe Elephant Park we were working to habituate three African Wild Dogs (also called Painted Dogs) to the sound of the vehicle. The goal was to get them used to our vehicle so that we could both identify all the members of the pack, check their health, and eventually dart them for translocation to a safer area. To do this, we routinely had to locate the alpha female which wears a radio-collar and place parts from a dead Nyala or Impala on the ground, chained or tied to a tree.

A recording of Painted Dogs making a kill was played and usually after 10-20 minutes the pack would have found us and sniffed out the free food. This was the first time that we saw the puppy come out from its den.

Painted Dog pups typically den for their first several weeks, suckling from their mother and, when they’re old enough, eating food regurgitated to them from their older pack members or small bits of food brought back for them. After only a couple of months they must be strong enough to follow the pack’s nomadic lifestyle and keep up on the exciting hunts. Once old enough to keep up with the pack, Painted Dogs typically let the youngest eat first to make sure that they have enough nourishment, which is why we see the adult deferring to the youngest member. The twittering sounds heard int his video mostly come from this feisty pup who is excited to have this feast and also bravely guarding his meal!

Like their canine cousins, Painted Dogs give birth to several pups per litter. Unfortunately the little pup in the video, probably 8-12 weeks old, was the only survivor. While it’s not uncommon for pups to be lost due to weakness or disease, it’s most likely that predator persecution by lions was the cause of this pup losing its siblings.

The pup was very strong and active during the observation period, as shown in this video. The high-pitched vocalizations that are heard are characteristic of Painted Dogs and serve as a means of expressing excitement over their meal and letting others in the pack know that there is food to share.

More Information:

Many people have mistaken the African Wild Dog (Lycaon pictus) as a diseased Wolf, Domestic Dog, or even Jackal. However there are several defining visual characteristics which set the African Wild Dog apart from its distant relatives in the Canidae family. The most obvious feature is the coloration of its coat. Often they have three distinct colors represented: white, black, and tan, although there are some dogs with little or no white. Close-up, it’s also easier to make out their ears which are larger than a similarly-sized dog’s or wolf’s and much more rounded than triangular.

African Wild Dogs are better described by their other name, “Painted Dogs,” because they are naturally wild and evolved independently from the other extant species in the Canidae family, which includes Wolves, Jackals, Coyotes, and Domestic Dogs. Painted Dogs live in packs with usually around a dozen members, but packs have been observed with three times that many members. They are among Africa’s most successful hunters. Painted Dogs achieve their goals at least 30% of the time, about twice as often as large cats including Lions which may hunt as a pride.

Unlike Lions and other species that live in a close-knit group, Painted Dogs often let their young eat first. This suggests that the dogs are not only grouping for social reasons, but because they are stronger as a pack and only as strong as their weakest member.

Accessorize Your Adventures: Patches (Part 1)

Accessories. Definitely unnecessary to a safe and wholesome adventure, but sometimes a little something extra is worth bringing along to share your pride, have some fun, or both!

Patches are one of those accessories that even ultra-light hikers can get behind to lighten up the atmosphere even if the 1 ounce (28 gram) piece of flair doesn’t lighten the load. Here is our first batch of overviews for Velcro/hook-and-loop patches that highlight some ways to stand out.

Camelbak hydration system with G&C American flag.

Above: Camelbak Thermobak (or click here for referral link to support us) hydration system which features a durable 500D nylon construction, 3 liter (100 ounce) capacity, and thermal material to keep your water at or below ambient temperature. Also check out the latest Thermobak Omega with new-generation camouflage (or click here to support us). I added on a green/forest green  American flag patch from Gadsden and Culpepper to add some flair. G&C-made or sourced patches are the best quality I’ve come across, so don’t be fooled by cheaper imitations!

Tactical Tailor Fight Light Operator Removable pack with 5.11 Eagle patch.
5.11 Eagle patch on a Tactical Tailor Fight Light Operator Removable pack .

Above: Tactical Tailor proudly designs and manufactures their equipment, like this Fight Light Operator Removable Pack (or click here to support us), in the USA. Although a little smaller than a typical backpack, this durable and functional is equipped with a quick-attachment system to add this pack to a larger piece of kit, such as a MALICE pack or traditional backpacking pack. With a 3×5-inch (7.6×12.7 cm) patch panel a variety of patches can be added including name, rank, blood type, or morale patches like the 5.11 Eagle patch.

Condor MA54 T&T pouch with ‘Guardians of the Galaxy’ Awesome Mix Vol. 1 cassette patch.
‘Guardians of the Galaxy’ Awesome Mix Vol. 1 cassette patch on a Condor T&T pouch.

Above: The Condor MA54 T&T Pouch (or click here to support us) is a 10×7.5×1.5-inch (25.4×19.0x3.8 cm) pouch with MOLLE attachments and MOLLE straps to attach or be attached to other gear. It works reasonably well as a writing surface when attached to a chest rig, but can also act as a catch-all utility bag due to its internal pockets.

The Awesome Mix Vol. 1 patch (or support us here) is made by Titan One and is based on the prop from the comic book super-hero movie adaptation ‘Guardians of the Galaxy.’ A fun 2.0×3.5-inch (5.0×8.9 cm) patch for large patch panels! Also sold as an iron-on!

Shown below is also a 5.11 patch depicting 5-ace-ace (5-1-1), the company’s own name, on the T&T Pouch. There’s plenty of space for multiple morale patches or to stick on other gear with a hook-and-loop/Velcro attachment.

Condor T&T pouch with 5.11 cards patch.

Above: One of the smallest pieces of gear to hold odds and ends, this Condor Pocket Pouch (or support us here) is a handy zippered, fold-out pouch with a standard-size 2.0×3.5-inch (5.0×8.9 cm) patch panel. Shown beside the Condor MA54 T&T Pouch for scale, it stores all the smalls you need to carry with you. Pens, a small notepad, identification, a small multitool, and anything else that is worth keeping within hand’s reach will fit into this 6.75×4.75-inch (17.1×12.0 cm) pouch. MOLLE strips will attach this to any appropriate tactical gear or carry it separately as a discreet, pocket-sized EDC bag.

Whether or not a pouch this size is useful will vary by individual and their existing gear, however some of the Condor Pocket Pouches are even sold as a set with a Condor American flag patch (standard size), which makes this an especially good deal for those that want it.


Stay tuned for more accessories, including a credit card-sized multitool, self-defense gear, and more morale-boosting gear.


As always I have used embedded links to the products which I’m reviewing. As I’m not sponsored by any organizations or companies it’s important to me that I provide “safe” and direct, referral-free links to the items I use, review, and may ultimately donate to conservationists and anti-poaching rangers in the field. However I’ve also included, in parenthesis, links to the same products while using a referral code. Following these links and placing an anonymous purchase through Amazon supports my adventures and future gear purchases and means I don’t have to rely on advertisements. All support is greatly appreciated.

Wildlife: Warthogs (Phacochoerus africanus)

Warthogs are one of at least four unique species in the pig family (Suidae) native to Africa. Other natives include the wild boar (Sus scrofa) in northern Africa, bushpig (Potamochoerus larvatus) in east Africa and southern Africa, and giant forest hog (Hylochoerus meinertzhageni) in isolated areas of central Africa. Species of warthog occur throughout parts of central Africa as well as the equatorial regions towards southern Africa and the eastern parts of southern Africa.

Conservation Status & Threats

Warthogs, African bushpigs, and Red River Hogs are threatened by hunting and poaching for their meat, but occur in large enough populations that they are not significantly threatened as species. At regional levels Warthogs are believed to have gone locally extinct in some West and North African states.

The canine teeth of Common Warthogs develop into tusks made from the same material as teeth in other animals, including Elephants. Like the ivory taken from African and Asian Elephant species, a Warthog’s ivory tusks have been carved and used in decorative and ceremonial applications. Due to the healthy status of many Warthog populations there may not be a prohibition on the domestic or international trade of their ivory, however the illicit way their tusks are acquired makes possession and trade problematic.

Warthogs in South Africa.

Relatives & Identification

Warthogs: Up to 63-85 cm (2-3 feet) at the shoulder. Males can weigh 60 to 150 kg (130 to 330 lb) while females are notably smaller at 45 to 75 kg (100 to 165 lb). Total body length 110-180cm (3.6-6 feet).

Males have two pairs of tusks: one pair on the upper part of their mouth and a second, smaller pair on the jaw fitting. With their mouth closed they fit closely together. Females have only a pair of upper tusks which can reach as much as 15.2-25.5 cm (6.0-10.0 inches) in length. The tusks of males can be even larger with one record-setting male possessing tusks 63.5 cm (25.0 inches) in length. Despite popular belief the tusks do not become “razor sharp” from normal use, but are still considerably dangerous.

Warthog Distribution: Increasingly diminishing distribution throughout South Africa. Large distribution throughout Sub-Saharan Africa.

Bushpigs: Up to 66 to 100 cm (26 to 39 in) at the shoulder, and weigh from 55 to 150 kg (121 to 331 lb). Total body length 130-170cm (3.6-6 feet).

Bushpig Distribution: Predominantly northeastern parts of Southern Africa and reaching into southern East Africa.

The giant forest hog, which currently has a scattered distribution in tropical parts of West and Central Africa, can weigh as much as 275 kg (606 lb). All species in the Suidae family native to Africa are capable swimmers in spite of their size.

Habitat & Behavior

Warthogs live in a male-dominant hierarchical structure typically based on age, which also correlates to size. However males are typically solitary even when steward of one or more females and offspring which form a group called a sounder. Depending on the quality of their habitat and success of the male in acquiring females, it may keep more than one sounder. Multiple sounders and bachelor males of related individuals form a clan and may occupy a specific range for generations.

Adolescent and adult males do not form a permanent part of this group but during mating seasons will move among sounders for receptive females. Unsuccessful or immature bachelor males may live alone or form small bachelor herds.

Warthogs are commonly diurnal, meaning that they are active during the day and sleep at night, but some populations may be primarily nocturnal especially where human-wildlife conflict exists. They require water and prefer to live in savanna, grasslands, and lightly wooded areas, but will expand into less forgiving environments with a satisfactory supply of water. Similar to Savanna Elephants and White Rhino and Black Rhino, warthogs enjoy wallowing in mud.

Warthogs kneeling to eat short grasses. RHA

Warthogs are among the only herbivores known to kneel on their forelimbs to eat at short grasses or drink water. While leaning down they are also able to make use of their tusks to pull up roots and succulent grasses. Their tusks are also defensive tools and with head held down point forwards during a charge.

Warthogs can run at up to 55 kph (34 mph), allowing them the speed to escape many ambush predators. Typically the warthog’s fight-or-flight response leading into a charge is a retreat away from a threat, however their size, speed, and determination to get out of danger makes Warthogs a clear threat to anything standing in their path. For this reason animals and especially humans on foot must be careful when walking in areas where warthogs are potentially present as scaring them can result in an inadvertent charge.

When panicked or stressed the long hairs running along the front-half of their back will stand on end. Unlike the African Bushpig, Warthogs have muscles near their tail which draw taught when running and helps hold the tail erect. This is thought to act as a signal to other warthogs who may follow a lead warthog to safety. The raised tail has also been associated with helping young to follow their mother through high grass, though this behavior and many other aspects of Warthogs is not yet fully understood.

Adult males are capable of digging their own burrow, but may take over those made by Porcupines or Aardvarks. If abandoned by the warthog these burrows are very important for other animals able to survive only because of the protective shelters made by other species.

A sounder of Warthogs grazing in South Africa. RHA.

Reproduction & Lifespan

Warthogs keep multiple burrows, or dens, within their home range so that there is always a safe place to sleep or to raise young. These burrows are often in enormous termite mounds that can be 2-3.5 meters high and go deep underground. These locations are thought to often be partially excavated by Aardvarks that feed on the termites, leaving  a nice area to make a den for the warthogs.

Unlike Bushpig piglets which have stripes, likely to camouflage them from the eyes of predators, Warthog piglets must rely solely on its mother and burrow for protection. Warthog sows give birth away from the male and will leave the burrow with their mother after 50 days. Unlike most hoofed animals, such as impala and gazelle, warthogs commonly give birth to multiple young in a single litter. The gestation period is approximately 170 days and litter sizes are typically 2-3, but a litter with as many as 8 piglets has been recorded. It takes roughly 21 weeks to completely wean the piglets and they will become a part of the sounder until sexual maturity is reached by 18-20 months of age.

Males typically leave their mother at 15 months old, but will still be three months shy of sexual maturity and about three years away from mating. Adult males engage in fights with other males, possibly over mates or resources, but are not known to be territorial or to fight over a specific range or den. The fights involve sidling up to one another and bashing their head sideways, taking out of play the ends of the tusks and reducing dramatic injuries.

Warthogs can live for more than a decade in the wild, with some examples living for as long as 17 years. In captivity a 17-18 year lifespan is possible.

Sources:

  • “The Safari Companion: A Guide to Watching African Mammals” by Richard D. Estes
  • “Walker’s Mammals of the World” by Ronald M. Nowak
  • “Stuarts’ Field Guide to Mammals of Southern Africa” by Chris & Mathilde Stuart

African Wildlife Encounter #1: African Wild Dogs & a Nyala (Graphic)

While on Somkhanda Game Reserve in South Africa I had the good fortune to witness a very natural animal encounter between predator and prey. Although my group had regularly seen this pack of African Wild Dogs in various states of rest, play, hunting, and post-hunt activities, this was the first time we had seen the pack make the kill from start to finish. Although gruesome, it was exciting to see them on the hunt and achieve success. We also got to see how the group dynamic played out, which often has the youngest members eating first (puppies, sub-adults) and the older, stronger members eating last. This is the opposite of lions and is likely one of the factors which contributes to the ability of canines to support many more individuals per group than feline species. Of course, some of the dogs higher in the hierarchy pull out the tasty bits for themselves or, as seen in the video, pull out the foul-smelling innards and drag it down-wind.

Many people have mistaken the African Wild Dog (Lycaon pictus) as a diseased Wolf, Domestic Dog, or even Jackal. However there are several defining visual characteristics which set the African Wild Dog apart from its distant relatives in the Canidae family. The most obvious feature is the coloration of its coat. Often they have three distinct colors represented: white, black, and tan, although there are some dogs with little or no white. Close-up, it’s also easier to make out their ears which are larger than a similarly-sized dog’s or wolf’s and much more rounded than triangular.

African Wild Dogs are better described by their other name, “Painted Dogs,” because they are naturally wild and evolved independently from the other extant species in the Canidae family, which includes Wolves, Jackals, Coyotes, and Domestic Dogs. Painted Dogs live in packs with usually around a dozen members, but packs have been observed with three times that many members. They are among Africa’s most successful hunters. Painted Dogs achieve their goals at least 30% of the time, about twice as successful as large cats including Lions which may hunt as a pride.

I’ve previously written about this topic in Fence Lines: Dividing Africa and its Wildlife, but in the video below we get to see exactly how predatory animals have adapted to the existence of fence lines and used them to their advantage. In the case of this pack of Painted Dogs we had previously seen them chasing prey towards fence lines, although not always with such results, and cooperating to make the kill.

Warning: This video is graphic.

Disclaimer: Red Hawk Adventures is not affiliated with Somkhanda Game Reserve or Wildlife ACT.

Please visit Somkhanda Game Reserve on Facebook or in person!

Equipment & Gear: KA-BAR’s Full-size Fighting Knife

KA-BAR (usually pronounced kay-bar) has a long history of use in the United States and became famous for being a dependable and choice pick for American soldiers during the Second World War. The brand name Ka-Bar also has an interesting origin and the fighting knives carrying this branding are known for being manufactured by Union Cutlery Co. in Olean, New York, USA.

Full-size Ka-Bar Fighting Knife (Black, Tanto) model being reviewed:

Part Number Ka-Bar 4-1259CP-2
Blade Color Black (with black blade)
Product Dimensions 12.81 x 3 x 1.125 inches (8″ blade; 0.165″ thickness)
Item Weight 317 grams (11.2 ounces)
Metal Type 1095 Cro-Van (USA manufacture)
Knife Origin Blade and grip made in USA.
Warranty Description Limited warranty of the life of the original purchaser.

Fighting Knife Sizes & Blade Lengths: The Full-size Fighting Knife is the penultimate, classic knife used by the United States Marine Corps and many other individuals that need the reliability and utility of a large knife. A perfect combination of light and strong, Ka-Bar’s full-size and short Fighting Knife styles embody the best utilities a knife can offer.

Made in the United States from 1095 Cro-Van steel like some of the other knives that Ka-Bar makes, including the Short Fighting Knife (reviewed here). These fighting knives have great durability and are easy to keep sharp. The full-size and Short Fighting Knife are both tempered to the same hardness rating of 56-58.

Ka-Bar’s Fighting Knife has an 8 inch (20 cm) blade length, longer even than the Swedish Fallkniven A1 survival knife. And with a larger handle than what is necessary for casual use. But this knife isn’t for casual use, it’s for getting you out of scrapes that you didn’t plan on, but did prepare for. To that end there’s nothing wrong with the size of the handle, but prospective buyers should definitely consider the added space it takes up compared to other knives.

The basic version of the Fighting Knife doesn’t directly compare with any of Fallkniven’s offerings due to the type of steel used in the blade and the price. But Ka-Bar does offer an “Extreme Fighting Knife” made from D2 semi-steel which is used in industrial tools and is even tougher than the best stainless steels without the expense of VG-10 high-carbon steel used in Fallkniven knives. With all the same specifications as the regular Fighting Knife the “Extreme” retails for around $180, but a savvy buyer can pick it up for $110. Meanwhile the Fallkniven A1 retails for around $350 in the U.S. but can be had much cheaper. Either version of the Fighting Knife offers excellent features and dependability for virtually any situation and at a very competitive price point.

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Top: Short KA-BAR with sheath; Bottom: Full-size KA-BAR Fighting Knife with glass-filled nylon sheath.

Sheath & Portability: Both knives featured in the photo above came with a hard sheath made from sturdy, glass-filled nylon. This sheath is light-weight and rigid, making it the ideal way to transport the knife and keep it on your belt or in your bug-out-bag. A nylon belt runs vertically to allow the sheath to be attached to a belt or to be looped to another piece of nylon or MOLLE attachment system. The body of the sheath also has a number of slits and reinforced holes to tie the sheath down in an ad-hoc fashion or for securing on the leg.

The underside of the sheath is flat, except for where it comes up to protect the hand guard. This backing also serves as a clip that secures the knife’s guard in place and thus keeps the knife locked tightly in the sheath. To pull the knife out of the sheath one only needs to use a thumb to push on the sheath’s backing and then slip out the knife.

Fighting Knife sheathed and secured.
Fighting Knife sheathed and secured, one nylon belt shown. The button shows some wear.

The hard sheath is a great design that doesn’t require any additional locks or points of failure that might break in the field. However the sheath does come equipped with two nylon belts that each have buttons that will further secure the knife in its sheath. This keeps the knife hilt and handle from flexing away from the backing of the sheath, and might help in rare situations where the guard could accidentally be pushed from the sheath’s clip.

The sheath’s underside is otherwise smooth for easy storing and to reduce the likelihood of getting it caught on apparel with pockets. The sheath even has a small opening to allow water to drip out while reducing the likelihood of dirt and debris getting in while the sheath is strapped to your side or attached to a MOLLE-compatible holder.

Side-view of the Short Fighting Knife secured in its sheath.
Side-view of the Short Fighting Knife secured in its sheath.

Although most versions of the Fighting Knife have options to come with a traditional leather sheath or the hard sheath, the Tanto models appear to still only come with the hard sheath. Ultimately which one is best for you will vary by personal preference. The glass-filled nylon hard sheath can come with the clip-style knives or be purchased separately. The Extreme Fighting Knife also has a version that comes with a nylon-and-velcro sheath, similar to what comes with multi-tools and similar gear.

One advantage of the hard sheath is the two ambidextrous straps to hold the knife secure. I really appreciate the functionality of the nylon straps and button clips on the Ka-Bar which do a perfect job of keeping the knife locked tightly and noiselessly in the sheath. Ka-Bar did a great job on this and it’s equally effective in wet and sandy conditions.

Unsheathed tanto-style Fighting Knife (top) and the Short Fighting Knife (bottom).
Unsheathed tanto-style Fighting Knife (top) and the Short Fighting Knife (bottom).

The size of the full-size Fighting Knife makes it unwieldy for some basic tasks and its noticeably less portable than its smaller sibling. This is a problem for all fixed-blade knives which is why a variety of knives of different sizes (and not just blade sizes) are on the market to fit any usage scenario and portability requirement. Some trade-offs might have to be made, but the photo above illustrates just how much bigger the 12.8 inch (32.5 cm) knife is compared to the 9.25 inch (23.5 cm) Short Fighting Knife.

Features & Versatility: Both the Short and full-size Fighitng Knife have a hilt that ends in a flat butt-cap which doubles as a hammer when the knife handle is held in a closed fist. This is great for beating tent stakes into the ground or for straightening a bent nail. The grooved, Kraton G polymer grip runs between the guard and the butt and gives the knife excellent handling characteristics in all weather conditions. The Kraton polymers are patented, synthetic materials used in place of rubber because it is longer lasting without sacrificing any of the durability or tactility of a rubber grip.

High quality screwdrivers and wood-working tools have a shank that runs the full length of the handle to provide the best possible rigidity and leverage. Like these tools, the Ka-Bar fighting knives all have true full-length shank running the length of the handle, sometimes called a full tang. This feature allows the knife to be used to pry things open and to withstand tremendous strain without breaking the blade (although it could bend). In the worst-case scenario these knives have even been used to dig foxholes when an entrenching tool was not available.

Top: Ka-Bar Full-size Fighting knife with 20-degree "Tanto" style blade shape. Second from top: Ka-Bar Small Fighting Knife with 20-degree "Clip" style blade. Second from bottom: Ka-Bar Mule Folder with 15-degree "Clip" style blade. Bottom: SOG Trident with a "Tanto" blade.
Top: Ka-Bar Full-size Fighting knife with 20-degree “Tanto” style blade shape. Second from top: Ka-Bar Small Fighting Knife with 20-degree “Clip” style blade. Second from bottom: Ka-Bar Mule Folder with 15-degree “Clip” style blade. Bottom: SOG Trident with a “Tanto” blade.

Ka-Bar’s Tanto vs. Clip Blade Styles: The shape of a knife’s blade will indicate the purpose it is best suited for. The tanto-style blade is designed for thrusting while the clip-style blade is best-suited for cutting, but can also perform thrusts. The clip-style blade in my opinion is a much more universally practical style and makes using the knife more ergonomically friendly. Ultimately every knife should be easy to use and not cause undue fatigue or stress on the arm or wrist, so I prefer the clip-style.

KA-BAR's tanto-style Fighting Knife (left) and SOG's tanto-style Trident (right).
KA-BAR’s tanto-style Fighting Knife (left) and SOG’s tanto-style Trident (right).

The tanto-style blade from Ka-Bar is a little different from the one that you’ll find on SOG’s knives that feature a tanto blade. Although they are fundamentally designed for the same purpose the SOG Trident line of knives with a tanto blade comes to a much more dramatic point with the spine sloping down several degrees. This creates a much more aggressive look and may prove more practical for making incisions. The Ka-Bar knives have a straight spine that leads directly to the tip of the blade. Ultimately the angle of the blade’s tip will dictate its usefulness in cutting, and can dramatically impact the ergonomic feel of using the knife. It’s important that buyers try out each knife before hand to find the one that fits their style and grip.

Final thoughts: Overall Ka-Bar’s tried and true entry in the full-size knife category has no faults and makes no apologies for its size as a utility and a very functional knife for virtually any situation. For some it’s definitely the perfect knife, but casual, non-combat users might consider something a little smaller, like the Short Fighting Knife due to its more versatile size and better portability.

Equipment & Gear: KA-BAR’s Short Fighting Knife

KA-BAR (usually pronounced kay-bar) has a long history of use in the United States and became famous for being a dependable and choice pick for American soldiers during the Second World War. The brand name Ka-Bar also has an interesting origin and the fighting knives carrying this branding are known for being manufactured by Union Cutlery Co. in Olean, New York, USA.

Short Black Ka-Bar Knife model being reviewed:

Part Number Ka-Bar 4-1259CP-2
Blade Color Black
Product Dimensions 9.25 x 1.8 x 1.0 inches (5.25″ blade; 0.165″ thickness)
Item Weight 181 grams (6.0 ounces)
Metal Type 1095 Cro-Van (USA manufacture)
Knife Origin Blade and grip made in USA.
Warranty Description Limited warranty of the life of the original purchaser.

E-05-KABAR_Short_Fighting_Knife_secure-2

Overview: The Short Ka-Bar Fighting Knife is, as its name implies, the smaller version of the tried and true Ka-Bar Fighting Knife that was popularized by the United States Marine Corps. Although the Short Fighting Knife’s dimensions are noticeably smaller, and weighs in at less than half a pound, it is made of the same 1095 Cro-Van steel that gives its larger sibling its durability. It is also tempered to the same hardness, rated at 56-58, and offers effectively the same utility.

The all-purpose Short Fighting Knife boasts no special features other than an optional serrated edge. It has no hook for skinning or slicing and does not even have a hole for a lanyard. It’s not that kind of knife.However KA-BAR does have a broad selection of knives to choose from, with several specialized for game.

The single-edged blade is 5.25 inches (13.3 cm) in length, 2.75 inches shorter than the full-size Fighting Knife’s 8-inch blade (20.3 cm). 5.25 inches is plenty of blade for most applications and makes the shorter knife as a whole a much more practical size for everyday activities and hobbies. The handle is also smaller and sized for the average user’s palm, whereas the Fighting Knife’s handle is comparatively over-sized. I find that the Short Fighting Knife has much better versatility when holstered at the hip, leg, or when the knife is in the hand.

A-00-KABARs_with_sheaths
Top: Short KA-BAR with sheath; Bottom: Full-size KA-BAR Fighting Knife with glass-filled nylon sheath.

Sheath & Portability: Both knives featured in the photo above came with a hard sheath made from sturdy, glass-filled nylon. This sheath is light-weight and rigid, making it the ideal way to transport the knife and keep it on your belt or in your bug-out-bag. A nylon belt runs vertically to allow the sheath to be attached to a belt or to be looped to another piece of nylon or MOLLE attachment system. The body of the sheath also has a number of slits and reinforced holes to tie the sheath down in an ad-hoc fashion or for securing on the leg.

The underside of the sheath is flat, except for where it comes up to protect the hand guard. This backing also serves as a clip that secures the knife’s guard in place and thus keeps the knife locked tightly in the sheath. To pull the knife out of the sheath one only needs to use a thumb to push on the sheath’s backing and then slip out the knife.

Side-view of the Short Fighting Knife secured in its sheath.
Side-view of the Short Fighting Knife secured in its sheath.
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Close-up of the Short Fighting Knife sheathed and secured via the clip above the guard.

The sheath is a great design that doesn’t require any additional locks or points of failure that might break in the field. However the sheath does come equipped with two nylon belts that each have buttons that will further secure the knife in its sheath. This keeps the knife hilt and handle from flexing away from the backing of the sheath, and might help in rare situations where the guard could accidentally be pushed from the sheath’s clip.

The sheath’s underside is otherwise smooth for easy storing and to reduce the likelihood of getting it caught on apparel with pockets. The sheath even has a small opening to allow water to drip out while reducing the likelihood of dirt and debris getting in while the sheath is strapped to your side or attached to a MOLLE-compatible holder.

Top: Short Ka-Bar with hard sheath; Bottom: Ka-Bar Mule Field Folder Knife
Top: Short Ka-Bar with hard sheath; Bottom: Ka-Bar Mule Field Folder Knife

Still, the portability of a sheathed fixed-blade knife compares poorly to a folding blade. Ka-Bar’s Mule Field Folder, reviewed here, provides a much more compact tool without compromising on heft or ergonomics. While the Mule Field Folder weighs in at 7.3 ounces (207 grams) the Short Fighting Knife isn’t far behind at an even 6 ounces (170 grams), not including the hard sheath. For portability the folding knife is definitely worth considering.

E-01-KABAR_Fighting_vs_KABAR_Combat-sm
Top: Full-size fighting knife for scale at 12.8 inches long. Bottom: Short fighting knife.

Features & Versatility: The knife is full-tang, meaning that it is made from a single piece of 1095 Cro-Van steel which runs through the length of the handle for maximum strength and durability. The handle ends in a flat butt-cap which doubles as a hammer when the knife handle is held in a closed fist. This is great for beating tent stakes into the ground or for straightening a bent nail. The rubber grip runs the entire 3.75 inch distance between the guard and the butt-cap and feels secure in sweaty, dirty, or cold hands.

Serrated edge of a brand new Short Fighting Knife (editor's personal knife was recently replaced).
Serrated edge of a brand new Short Fighting Knife (editor’s personal knife was recently replaced).

The optional serrated edge runs 30 millimeters, or just over 1 inch. It’s a reasonable length for an all-purpose knife, but is only two-thirds the length of the Mule Field Folder’s serrated edge. Overall the serration is perfect for quickly and decisively cutting through paracord, a small branch, or cloth.

Top: Ka-Bar Full-size Fighting knife with 20-degree "Tanto" style blade shape. Second from top: Ka-Bar Small Fighting Knife with 20-degree "Clip" style blade. Second from bottom: Ka-Bar Mule Folder with 15-degree "Clip" style blade. Bottom: SOG Trident with a "Tanto" blade.
Top: Ka-Bar Full-size Fighting knife with 20-degree “Tanto” style blade shape. Second from top: Ka-Bar Small Fighting Knife with 20-degree “Clip” style blade. Second from bottom: Ka-Bar Mule Folder with 15-degree “Clip” style blade. Bottom: SOG Trident with a “Tanto” blade.

Ka-Bar’s Tanto vs. Clip Blade Styles: The shape of a knife’s blade will indicate the purpose it is best suited for. The tanto-style blade is designed for thrusting while the clip-style blade is best-suited for cutting, but can also perform thrusts. The clip-style blade in my opinion is a much more universally practical style and makes using the knife more ergonomically friendly. Ultimately every knife should be easy to use and not cause undue fatigue or stress on the arm or wrist, so I prefer the clip-style.

SOG Trident Tanto TF-6 with stainless steel finish and a US quarter and UK pound for scale.
SOG Trident Tanto TF-6 with stainless steel finish and a US quarter and UK pound for scale.

The clip-point blade from Ka-Bar is a little different from the one that you’ll find on SOG’s knives (see above) that feature a tanto blade. Although they are fundamentally designed for the same purpose the SOG Trident line of knives with a tanto blade comes to a much more dramatic point with the spine sloping down several degrees. This creates a much more aggressive look and may prove more practical for making incisions or other applications, but make it less practical in others. The Ka-Bar knives either have a straight spine that leads directly to the tip of the blade or a slight clip-point as shown below.E-08-KABAR_Short_Fighting_Knife_blade

Closing Thoughts: Ka-Bar is a tried and true brand with a history of reliability and consistent manufacturing quality. The Short Fighting Knife is my personal favorite fixed-blade knife because it is a good size and has a great balance in the hand. It offers all-purpose utility at a reasonable price (MSRP is $88, but can be had for $50). Although the steel is not as fancy as what is found in $200 knives, the 1095 steel is well-suited for field use and sharpens easily. In the 4-8 inch blade market I can think of no more reliably performing knife for its price.